Do you care if patterns are tested?

Legit question: do you care if patterns are tested?

It probably depends on what the pattern is for (garments for example almost definitely need testing) but for blankets etc does it matter to you?

I have a bunch of graphghan patterns that I’m never going to be able to test myself and I’m in the mind to just release them anyway. The written instructions are generated from the graph so the only mistakes will be from me manually transferring the pattern to the ribblr format.

Should I just release them with a disclaimer?

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Testing is absolutely optional, but I have found that the patterns with “makes” sell better, and testing is the fastest way to get those.

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I really doubt anyone is going to be selling makes from my patterns and they’re free anyway

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It would depend on their complexity. If there are makes, that would also make me more inclined

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Not that anyone is selling makes, but when you use a pattern and make a journal, that shows up on the pattern page, same with testing. If you were to sell the patterns, seeing those pictures makes someone more inclined to buy a pattern

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Your afghans look very intricate and detailed. Don’t sell yourself short​:heart:

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This is probably why there aren’t any makes for them except mine (excluding the one i outsourced testing for)

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My released patterns don’t have makes except mine so I think its a moot point.

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they don’t right now, but if they are free, anyone can work one and post it and then it would be a make that shows up when someone else clicks on your pattern. You don’t get makes because you sell, you get makes because someone used your pattern, it just happens if they decide to do so… You get to chose if they are allowed to sell the make, but the make will still be there if they want it to be. What I was saying is that if you were wanting to sell your pattern, or a pattern in the future, those journals will make it sell faster and testing is the easiest way to get those journals. But even if you keep all your patterns free, and you do not allow other people to sell the items they make from the patterns, you can possibly still have makes under your pattern and those makes will still help people decide if you are worth spending one of their 5 free pattern per day on.

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another thought
there are more shops out there than I would like to admit that simply copy-pasted their patterns into the program and they range from sloppy to unworkable and so much time and yarn was wasted even if they were free patterns. Having those journals, recruited or natural interest, shows that your pattern does work here at ribblr as well.

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Amen sister!!

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I prefer to get stuff tested so I can get a different point of view and help fixing copy and paste errors.

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But do you find that patterns that have been tested do better than ones that haven’t?

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Yes, that was my answer several times, in great detail.
Patterns that have been tested will create journals (“makes”) that will show up on the page when a pattern is clicked on. Those journals act as a review and those patterns will sell better than ones that have not.

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I understand but journals are not relevant here. The only person testing my patterns is me. I’m asking if the addition of the line ‘this pattern has been tested’ has any impact on deciding to get the pattern or not.

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Personally I always am more inclined to try a pattern that has been tested and has makes. I once bought a pattern that may not have been tested, had no makes and I couldn’t complete it.

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I have answered this question many times in great detail. I don’t know what you are not understanding.
A) You publish a pattern on ribblr
B) You publish a pattern on ribblr and say you tested it
C) you publish a pattern on ribblr and don’t say you tested it
D) you publish a pattern on ribblr and someone on ribblr decides to use your pattern to make a blanket and does not publish a journal
E) you publish a pattern on ribblr and someone on ribblr decides to use your pattern and publish a journal which is also called a “make” on ribblr
F) you write a pattern in ribblr and ask for testers in ribblr, those testers make a blanket from your pattern and publish a journal, which is also called a make in ribblr
G) you publish a pattern on ribblr and only say that other people have said the pattern works but there are no journals attached to in within ribblr to show that the pattern was correct within the ribblr program
of all the above scenarios, the options that include a journal or “make” will be more likely to be chosen by a person on ribblr

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Well if you’re just testing your own patterns(as is the standard minimum) no it won’t make a difference as it is expected you will at least proofread a pattern before you sell it on.
I have released 2 patterns that weren’t tested by others and they are my worst performing patterns. Not sure if this is because on the tested patterns there’s more journals, more photos or reassurance that the pattern is workable but this is how it works for me.
I wouldn’t mark a pattern as tested if I didn’t have someone outside of myself testing, as you will read it how you intend for it to be used and not how a third party trying out the pattern would.

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yes, not only have my patterns with journals done better…but my two best sellers have multiple journals even though they are not my “best” patterns or the patterns with the most interest (wishlists) People want to see what other people did with the pattern.

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If I’m purchasing a pattern, I’d expect it to be tech edited, or at least tested. If it’s a freebie, I’m happy to take the risk. I’d always recommend at least having a second pair of eyes test or check over a pattern to iron out any typos, missing info or maths errors. Accuracy is so important in patterns.

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