How to write down a patter g

Hello everyone. :blush:

I’ve been looking through the topics, and I found that the general advice for “how to go about creating your own pattern” is trial and error.
Now I wonder, how do you note that down? Like, e.g. if you try to make a doll based on a person, and let’s say you’re on round 45 and it’s not working out you end up unraveling a few rounds, but where to stop? Or leave it be and start all over again, maybe end up with several bodies for later comparisons?
I have never used a crochet chart before, only text patterns, which format would you recommend for making a pattern?

To be honest it kinda feels a bit overwhelming right now :confounded:.
Cheers all around :raising_hand_woman:t4:

7 Likes

This question comes up often, and recently there was a very wise response (I’m paraphrasing)
If you are confused on how to write a pattern, it is because you are not yet experienced enough and need to wait on trying to publish a pattern.

As far as taking notes goes, if you make a mistake and back up, your notes should back up as far as your work does

I also think the consensus here is written over charted (not my preference though)

6 Likes

definitely a written over charted person

6 Likes

I like charts for smaller things. Big amigurimi though just give me it written. :stuck_out_tongue:

Stitch markers are your friend if you’ve got to back up

6 Likes

I have dyscalculia, written directions are extremity difficult for me… I can knit an item faster than the time it takes me to convert my patterns to publish :upside_down_face:

7 Likes

I have the exact opposite problem, my eyes don’t track well when using a chart, but written instructions are fine. I even have to use safety pin markers to count my rows in knitting, all the rows just mesh together for counting.

4 Likes

Thank you all for your replies.

Well, I actually don’t intend to publish anything, I just wanted to make a birthday present for a friend but I wasn’t able to find the specific pattern anywhere, so I figured … go try myself xD
I miscount all the time (e.g i made a Pipi Longstocking for a friend and instead of 50 rows I accidentally made 60 for the legs so I had to add 10 rows to the torso and arms and in the end the doll was gigantic xD also had my partner calculate the rows since maths and I don’t like each other)

But yea, that was a year ago and even though I somewhat have a doll, just a generic one, I kinda struggle with creating the sweater and the pants.
:blush::upside_down_face::blush:

5 Likes

so, “winging it” works much better in crochet than knitting…
basically, you need to have some sort of dedicated row counter available to keep with the project.
there are apps that do this, but I don’t like using them. You especially want to keep track of something that will be doubled like legs and arms so that you do the same thing on the other side.
Crochet is insanely easy to unravel because you only have one live stitch at a time, just mark somewhere the beginning point of your rounds so you know when you have completed or removed a full round and adjust your notes accordingly.

4 Likes

Oh in that case I’d just wing it. Even on arms and legs I just hold the second one next to the first to compare until it’s right. :laughing:

4 Likes