What makes pattern a low-sew to you?

Hello people! I come to you with another questionregard patterns :smile:
Since I’m working on my own first pattern and I want it to be P E R F E C T :stuck_out_tongue: I want to ask you what makes a pattern low-sew to you? What do you think is required for a pattern to classify as such?
For me it’s when we have only one or two things to sew on like arms, tail, ears or such.

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For me it’s 2 or 3 things. Generally the legs, body and head is one piece, and arms and ears (or other appendages) need to be sewn on.

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I agree, just a few things (1 or 2) to sew is low sew.

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Thats my thoughts exactly!

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I agree, I expect every pattern might have a tiny amount of sewing unless it’s just a simple ball or square.
To me “no sew” means that when I fasten off for the last time the only finishing I have to do is weaving in ends. I don’t count embroidered details like facial features as sewing.
“Low sew” has more wiggle room to me, then I don’t mind if I have to sew on a couple of bits or a short seam or two. But I appreciate it when the designer thinks ahead about reducing sewing. For example if it was a fish amigurumi pattern perhaps you could make the fins first so that you can just pick up the stitches to attach the fins as you go, or instead of making the fins separately you could pick up the foundation row stitches on the main body of the fish so no sewing is required later, and all you need to do was pull the yarn tails from the fins to the inside and fasten them.
Have fun designing and happy stitching!

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For me, low sew is sewing on 1-2 little pieces.
Normal amount of sewing would be 3-5 imo
And more than that is a sewing heavy piece
As for no sew, i dont count weaving in ends, surface crocheting, or embroidery as part of sewing

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