Asking Tips for pattern writting

Hi I’m planning to write a bag pattern using granny squares. I would like to ask if you have any tips or advice. It’s my first time so I’m very new to pattern writing. Though I have participated a pattern test before but I think it’s different since I’m gonna write it myself. Anything will be a great help for me! Thank You in Advance :smile:

OMG THANK YOU SO MUCH TO ALL THE TIPS AND ADVICE IT IS REALLY HELPFUL I REALLY REALLY APPRECIATE ALL OF YOUR EFFORT AND SHARING OF THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE FOR WRITING A PATTERN. I’ve been so busy lately sorry for the late responses…

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I’m not really great with granny squares but I think writing the pattern down like per row/round of the square would work nicely

I’ve made a bag with those squares before though and I think it would be really nice to add images of how to connect the squares, like either pictures of actual squares or maybe a simplified drawing showing where to connect (or even from multiple angles)

Also sending the pattern to testers is great, that way you can see if the pattern is clear to follow and get feedback about it

Lots of good luck with it :heart:

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This is how I do it:

  1. I make several prototypes until I get the design “right”.
  2. Make a new copy of the design, and either film or photograph it.
  3. If I film, I then have to edit and crop photos out of it.
  4. I use Google Docs and write out each step, inserting appropriate photos for each one.
  5. Check, check, check, check…for accuracy.
  6. Go to Ribblr and open split screen so I can see the Google doc and Ribblr at the same time.
  7. If I have a similar pattern (like a block or a dog coat), I copy that pattern and edit it with the new design.
  8. OR begin a new design, answering each of the questions.
  9. I have a Master list of each step, which I check off as I go along.
  10. Go line by line thru Ribblr, copy and paste from my Google doc. I check for accuracy in the original document as I build my Ribblr pattern,
  11. Publish.
  12. Come back the next day and check everything over, as sometimes I’m tired and make mistakes.

THEN:
13. Download the Google doc as a pdf.
14. Publish that pdf to my website, and any other place like Etsy or Ravelry.
15. Make advertising “memes” for my Facebook page and any crochet groups I’m a part of.
16. Advertise (where acceptable) to groups.
17. Pinterest pins made, and published.
18. Instagram posts made and published.
19. Make another cuppa coffee and go back to crocheting.
20. Whew!

Most important (I think): organize your desktop files as you go.
I make a main file, titled the name of the design.
Then subfiles I can access as I go along:
Design Advertising
Design Stock photos/video
Design BEST photos
Design Info
Design PATTERN pdf

If these files are in order to start with, everything runs quite smoothly.

I also have a system for writing out patterns as I go along…
just lined note paper, but with this basic information to fill in:

Design Name
Yarn, etc

Then:
Row/Stitch/Amount/Notes

This setup really helps me, as I can focus on the design, and simply fill in the info as I go along.
When I then go to transfer that info into a pattern, I can read my various notes about “turning” or “tie off”, etc.

If there is a step that requires some explanation, I make a note of it, and then expand that one part.

I hope this makes sense…

Most of all:
go row by row,
give loads of info if needed (more is better than less)
and if you can: row count totals (that really helps the customer, if in the event I mistyped an instruction, they can still figure out what I meant by a row tally comparison.)

If I need to make a chart, I use Canva,
Works great and is very cheap.
Also: Canva is built for interfacing with Pinterest/YouTube/Facebook/Instagram, etc…so it makes any expansion of your crochet business much, much easier.

Attached: an example of a chart I made with Canva (these pop into a Ribblr pattern super easy! Just click on the file icon to add it.)
If you need to add more than one photo to explain your row instruction, just select a new line and add it there with a caption.

Hope this helps…
and Happy Stitchin’



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Here is my rough draft for a block…
By using the same simple columns with each and every design, I can concentrate on the design and my notes make sense later.

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I’m new to pattern writing too—my best tip is to just write down EVERY SINGLE STEP of the process—from making a magic loop to tying off and weaving in the ends.

Make sure you could make the granny square again by following your instructions.
If you can, they can!

:yarn::purple_heart:

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Hi!

That’s exactly why Ribbuild exists- you can write the pattern as you design it. Take photos/videos directly as you write the instructions on any device.

You can always remove/duplicate/merge with just one click.

Once the pattern is ready, you can use the testing tools to test it so people can give you feedback.
If you need a PDF just use the ‘generate PDF’ file - although be wary for PDF piracy.

Hope this helps! Check out Ribblr’s playlist for designers on Youtube:

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Oh my word! Look at all that work!! And people quibble about paying for a pattern?

Smh

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Thank you so much I really appreciate this very informative and helpful advice I will keep this in my notes!

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OMG thank you for a very clear explanation this is really helpful and full of details will take note of this. Thanks I really appreciate the effort. :heart: I’m learned so many things.

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Wow this is very simple my drafts was a whole mess :sweat_smile:

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Yup thanks I didn’t do this at first :sweat:, the next square I’ve written a draft and some notes which is very helpful :smiley:

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yaay thanks I’ll be using it after finishing a better draft and the product itself. It will be very easy and convenient, I’m still adjusting to the digital world in terms of writing haha I’m not used to it lol. :joy:

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