How to charge for commissions?

How do you determine price when someone asks you about commissions? I’ve been asked for an amigurumi figure, and besides yarn and time what else do you take into consideration?
This would be my very first commission so I don’t want to mess it up by doing the wrong thing.
Thanks everyone! I love it here!!! :heart:

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I usually base my prices on materials x 3 and if that seems off for item I add a bit extra for an hourly wage. With the cost of yarn which is atrocious most of the time I barely make my time after I pay for materials. Hopefully this makes sense.
Also welcome to the community :purple_heart:

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Thanks! I’m so glad someone suggested this community! :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

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Other have charged 12-14 dollars an inch.

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I think I responded once in cents instead of dollars, but yes

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Some charge by the hours spent working on it, some (like my daughter) charge a flat rate per inch of the largest dimension with an up charge for intricate shapes or excessive embroidery
But she is at expert level and can ask for a lot.
If you are just starting out or can honestly say that your work could use more practice, you may want to start with a more modest price to just cover double your cost (including any fees, taxes, and shipping)

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It was you who said that, I couldn’t remember.

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yeah, she charges between 10 and 20 dollars per inch.
Example
one of her my little pony models has floppy leg joints so it it lays down. That one gets measured from hoof to hoof and runs $12 per inch for domestic orders. But if you want the fancy eyes, up charge. You want “real” hair (combed out and ironed yarn to make more like wig hair that gets styled) upcharge, you want the legs stiff to stand up, upcharge. The character you like has wings or a horn? Yep, upcharge.
So one of the fancy alicorn princesses that would have been a standard 7 inch for about $80 shoots up to nearly $200 for the same size.
But as I said, she is extremely skilled and has been doing this for nearly 10 years now. She takes any animated character you send her (or drawing) and turns it into a plushie. So the background characters that aren’t commercially available or your child’s drawings, things that would be hard to get elsewhere. These are not the standard ami.

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That’s awesome! And you taught her everything she knows?

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I mean I taught her the basics, needlework and fiber arts… all arts in general were always a huge part of our homelife and both kids were homeschooled. She was the one that came across amigurumi online and came running out of her room with her laptop and furiously howled at me that I “didn’t tell her she could do anything USEFUL with that crochet crap!”
By the time she was 14, I decided she was good enough to warrant an online shop. She researched and decided on etsy and has 2 shops now, one for ami and sewing and the other for her drawing and art stuff

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I’d love to see her shops!

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She just moved and has everything on pause till she gets settled

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Besides, she does not keep much on there since she works pretty much solely commissions now. The stuff in there would be items that the buyer didn’t pay for or changed their mind

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