Knitting Tips

I have been crocheting for a year and a half now. So I wanted to try and learn to knit. But it’s not the easiest as I have found out :joy:…Do y’all have any tips for a beginner knitter?

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Well, me being a beginner knitter as well (been crocheting for quite some time now), I would say don’t give up and also: find your way to hold your yarn! When I crochet I went though what feels like a million different ways to hold the yarn, and with knitting I started holding it kind of like I do when I crochet, but I eventually realized I had been yarn overing the wrong way :sweat_smile: So the way I learned you’re supposed to hold the yarn in your right hand if you’re a righty when you’re knitting, and for crocheting I usually hold my crochet hook in my right hand and the yarn in my left, so I basically did it that way as a cheat and had then eventually found out I was yarn overing wrongly, so I switched to my right hand holding the yarn! I will definitely say it takes some getting used to, but it’s all worth it in the end :wink: I crochet much much more but once in a while I might knit :blush:

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i hold my yarn the same way a crocheter does, yarn in my left hand. When I yarn over i use the needle in my right hand to yarn over. when you yarn over, one way won’t add the bigger lacey hole, the other way gives you a lacey hole, it will be habits and muscle memory.

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Many people learn English knitting (“throwing” the yarn over the needle with the right hand), but if you are used to guiding the yarn with your left hand for crocheting, you might want to check out the continental knitting technique. There are quite a few tutorials on YouTube to learn continental knitting.

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I have been knitting and crocheting for many, many years. I love them both and switch from one to another depending on the project I’m wanting to do.
As mentioned by another, there are two main ways to knit, continental (yarn in left hand) and English (yarn in left hand). I find that it’s all about comfort, but then I was taught one way so switching would be difficult. You being new have the perfect advantage. It is said that the continental is quicker since there are less movements.
All in all I would definitely use YouTube a lot. There are so many great videos .

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I actually started my first knit project with an arm knitting pattern and chunky yarn. Something about that helped me grasp the concept like never before. I was a master crocheter but had never caught on in knitting. Now I’m a master knitter, too!

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Welcome to Ribblr! You’ll love it here :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

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You probably already know this from crocheting, but start with a project in a light color! It’s a lot easier to see mistakes on a pale or white yarn than black or dark color, and mistakes are the best way to learn! I’d also recommend starting with a chunkier yarn weight so it knits up faster and “feels” like you’re making more progress. I find that crocheting is faster than knitting, but also uses more yarn. I learned to knit before I learned to crochet, but I’d definitely say that learning how to regulate tension in knitting helped me with crochet, so I’d imagine it would be the same going the other way. Good luck with your knitting endeavors!

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Knitcro addict has three quick YouTube tutorials that made it click for me. Just give yourself multiple opportunities to try. It’ll click eventually!

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I recommend continental knitting (with yarn in the left hand. if you’re right handed) I hold my yarn the same way for both crochet and knitting,

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